Nursing History Events

Please get in touch if you would like an event listing here.


Nov
15
Thu
Florence Nightingale’s London (Walking Tour) @ Dorchester Hotel
Nov 15 @ 10:30 – 13:00
Florence Nightingale’s London (Walking Tour) @ Dorchester Hotel | England | United Kingdom

Start: 10.30am outside The Dorchester Hotel on Park Lane (nearest underground stations are Hyde Park Corner and Marble Arch)

Finish: The Florence Nightingale Museum in St Thomas’s Hospital (nearest underground stations are Westminster and Waterloo).

Walk in the footsteps of the ‘mother of nursing’ and discover the life of Florence Nightingale through the places where she lived and worked. From the house where she spent the last days of her long life, the hotel where she wrote her famous Notes on Nursing, the statue of the Lady with the Lamp, to the hospital where she founded her nursing school. Along the way, we take a look at her life and visit London as she knew it.

This walk lasts approximately 2.5 hours, and will be conducted at a reasonable walking pace so please wear appropriate footwear. We advise a max. number of participants of 20.

Nov
22
Thu
The Coroner’s Lament: Addressing the Hazards of the Working Class Home, 1840-1910 @ Room CM15
Nov 22 @ 17:30

Dr Vicky Holmes (Queen Mary University, London)

Dec
6
Thu
John Ash Annual Lecture @ Arthur Thompson Hall
Dec 6 @ 16:30
Dec
11
Tue
Florence Nightingale’s London (Walking Tour) @ Dorchester Hotel
Dec 11 @ 10:30 – 13:00
Florence Nightingale’s London (Walking Tour) @ Dorchester Hotel | England | United Kingdom

Start: 10.30am outside The Dorchester Hotel on Park Lane (nearest underground stations are Hyde Park Corner and Marble Arch)

Finish: The Florence Nightingale Museum in St Thomas’s Hospital (nearest underground stations are Westminster and Waterloo).

Walk in the footsteps of the ‘mother of nursing’ and discover the life of Florence Nightingale through the places where she lived and worked. From the house where she spent the last days of her long life, the hotel where she wrote her famous Notes on Nursing, the statue of the Lady with the Lamp, to the hospital where she founded her nursing school. Along the way, we take a look at her life and visit London as she knew it.

This walk lasts approximately 2.5 hours, and will be conducted at a reasonable walking pace so please wear appropriate footwear. We advise a max. number of participants of 20.

Dec
13
Thu
The Radical Whistleblower: Doctors, Patients, Truth and Resistance in the Age of Reform @ Room CM15
Dec 13 @ 17:30

Dr Rebecca Wynter (University of Birmingham)

Words and Deeds: Nursing, Poetry and the Women’s Movement @ The People’s History Museum
Dec 13 @ 18:30 – 20:30

A free evening performance of music and poetry, celebrating women’s voices around the campaign for the vote. Audrey Ardern- Jones, nurse and poet, performs poetry by female authors involved in the campaign for women’s suffrage, together with international musicians Lucas Jordan (flute) Fabricio Mattos (guitar). The event will be introduced with a talk by Krista Cowman, Professor of History at the University of Lincoln, highlighting nurses involved in the suffrage movement and the connections between efforts by women’s professions to improve their working conditions and the women’s movement.

Jan
11
Fri
Locating Health: Regional Historical Perspectives on Human Care 1800-1948 @ Humanities Building
Jan 11 @ 10:00 – 18:00
Locating Health: Regional Historical Perspectives on Human Care 1800-1948 @ Humanities Building | England | United Kingdom

Keynote speaker: Professor Christine Hallett (University of Huddersfield)

This one-day workshop seeks to bring together researchers with an interest in the history and representations of healthcare, medicine, nursing, hospitals, and public health in the UK between 1800 and 1948, with a particular focus on local and regional histories.

Over the course of the nineteenth century, healthcare became increasingly organised, centralised and professionalised, paving the way for the reforms of the twentieth century leading to a national healthcare system. But this process was piecemeal and haphazard, often dependent on local and even individual initiatives. Hospitals were funded by local subscriptions; reforms such as the introduction of professional nurses, district nursing, and improvements to workhouse infirmaries occurred on a local basis, and spread only gradually.

As a result, the experiences of patients, nurses, doctors and other care practitioners differed significantly according to geographical location, as well as by class, wealth, and gender. This workshop seeks to highlight these local and regional differences and experiences in order to build up a more textured, nuanced picture of the development of healthcare in the industrial age.

This workshop is the first of a series to be held arising from the AHRC-funded project ‘Florence Nightingale Comes Home for 2020’, which examines the influence of Nightingale’s upbringing in the Midlands on her work and ideas. This first workshop invites contributions from a wide range of scholars in order to develop insights into broader histories of health and care in a regional perspective.

Jan
31
Thu
Preventive Strikes: The History of Female Cancers @ RCN Library and Heritage Centre
Jan 31 @ 17:00 – 19:00

For many years, hysterectomy was widely relied on for both cure and prevention of female cancers. Historian Ilana Löwy talks about her research, which has highlighted the damaging effects of some of these “preventive strikes”. Today, specialist nurses co-ordinate the diagnostic and treatment journey for cervical cancer, as well prevention to include smear tests and breast cancer screenings and managing the consequences of treatment. Cancer Nurse specialist Tracie Miles looks at the current role of the Clinical Nurse Specialist in cancer patient care today.

Feb
7
Thu
Fertility Treatment: How far should we go? @ RCN Library and Heritage Centre
Feb 7 @ 17:00 – 19:00

In 1978, Louise Brown made history by being the first baby born after in vitro fertilisation (IVF). In the forty years since, IVF has become an established method of treatment for infertility, yet debates around access continue. Jane Denton, Director of the Multiple Births Foundation, chairs a panel discussion exploring the introduction of IVF and concerns arising from it. Kay Elder gives a personal perspective from her role in the early years of the first IVF programme, while Jane Stewart, Chair of the British Fertility Society, explores the question: “Does everyone have the right to fertility treatment on the NHS?”

Feb
13
Wed
The Science of Woman: From Wandering Womb to Gynae Nursing @ Thackray Museum
Feb 13 @ 17:00 – 19:00

For centuries, women were thought of as being at the mercy of their biology. From the ancient Greek notion of the “wandering womb” to more recent attention to PMT and the menopause, women’s health has been used to explain and justify cultural attitudes to women. Find out about the fascinating history of women’s health, alongside modern initiatives in women’s health nursing.

Free admission to the Thackray Museum with an event ticket!



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